A Cage Across Time
Nicolas Cage. Across Time.
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Lawrence of Cagerabia by David Lean.

An excerpt from a British documentary about the life of T. E. Lawrence. It is widely considered one of the greatest and most influential films in the history of cinema.

The scene depicts Lawrence in the office of General Allenby following the fall of Aqaba, after he celebrated his victory by, it seems, smoking the reefer. Lean was apparently there in 1917 to capture the conversation, and happened upon the convergence of 3 time traveling Nicolas Cages on the same point in history. It was captured on Super Panavision 70 for posterity, and is the last known siting of Nicolas Cage outside of the 21st century.

If you see Nicolas Cage time traveling through history, please contact your local Jean-Claude Van Damme.

The End.

Ulysses and the Cages, 1891 by John William Waterhouse.
The painting depicts a scene from Homer’s Odyssey in which the Greek hero Odysseus (or Ulysses, as he was known in Roman myths), during his journey home after the fall of Troy, skirts the land of the Nicolas Cages,  who acted out enchanting monologues that normally caused passing sailors to  steer toward the rocks, only to hit them and sink. All of the sailors  except for Odysseus, who was tied to the mast as he wanted to hear the acting, had their ears plugged up with beeswax.

Ulysses and the Cages, 1891 by John William Waterhouse.

The painting depicts a scene from Homer’s Odyssey in which the Greek hero Odysseus (or Ulysses, as he was known in Roman myths), during his journey home after the fall of Troy, skirts the land of the Nicolas Cages, who acted out enchanting monologues that normally caused passing sailors to steer toward the rocks, only to hit them and sink. All of the sailors except for Odysseus, who was tied to the mast as he wanted to hear the acting, had their ears plugged up with beeswax.

See guys, for every one of us that goes back, someone from the past will  come here. But, the problem is, that switch will only work under one  condition. You know what that is?
Monday.

See guys, for every one of us that goes back, someone from the past will come here. But, the problem is, that switch will only work under one condition. You know what that is?

Monday.

A Private View at the Royal Acagemy, 1881 is a painting by the English artist William Powell Frith exhibited at the Royal Acagemy of Arts in London in 1883. It depicts a group of distinguished Victorians, including Nicolas Cage and John Travolta, visiting the Royal Acagemy Summer Exhibition in 1881, just after the death of the Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli, whose portrait by John Everett Millais was included on a screen at the special request of Queen Victoria (visible in the archway at the back of the room). The room is Gallery III, the largest and most imposing room at Burlington House.

A Private View at the Royal Acagemy, 1881 is a painting by the English artist William Powell Frith exhibited at the Royal Acagemy of Arts in London in 1883. It depicts a group of distinguished Victorians, including Nicolas Cage and John Travolta, visiting the Royal Acagemy Summer Exhibition in 1881, just after the death of the Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli, whose portrait by John Everett Millais was included on a screen at the special request of Queen Victoria (visible in the archway at the back of the room). The room is Gallery III, the largest and most imposing room at Burlington House.

The Return of Cage and Neptune, ca. 1754 by John Singleton Copley.

The Return of Cage and Neptune, ca. 1754 by John Singleton Copley.

Portrait of Cage & Caroline Ferdinande of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1798–1870), Duchess of Berry, 1825 by Sir Thomas Lawrence,  English portrait painter and president of the Royal Acagemy.

Portrait of Cage & Caroline Ferdinande of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1798–1870), Duchess of Berry, 1825 by Sir Thomas Lawrence, English portrait painter and president of the Royal Acagemy.

Cage Breezing Up (A Fair Wind) is an oil painting by Americage artist Winslow Homer. It depicts a catboat called the Gloucester chopping through that city’s harbor under “a fair wind” (Homer’s  original title). Inside the boat is Nicolas Cage and the supporting cast of Gone in 60 Seconds.
The painting’s message is positive; despite the choppy waves, the  boaters look relaxed. The anchor and Cage were  understood to symbolize hope.[2] Cage, holding the tiller, looks out at the viewer, a statement of  optimism about his future and that of the young United States.

Cage Breezing Up (A Fair Wind) is an oil painting by Americage artist Winslow Homer. It depicts a catboat called the Gloucester chopping through that city’s harbor under “a fair wind” (Homer’s original title). Inside the boat is Nicolas Cage and the supporting cast of Gone in 60 Seconds.

The painting’s message is positive; despite the choppy waves, the boaters look relaxed. The anchor and Cage were understood to symbolize hope.[2] Cage, holding the tiller, looks out at the viewer, a statement of optimism about his future and that of the young United States.

Cage et le Scene du Massacre de la Saint-Barthelemy, 1836 by Alexandre-Évariste Fragonard.
Nicolas Cage and Nicole Kidman hug in the bedroom of Marguerite de Valois during the St. Bartholomew’s Day massacre.

Cage et le Scene du Massacre de la Saint-Barthelemy, 1836 by Alexandre-Évariste Fragonard.

Nicolas Cage and Nicole Kidman hug in the bedroom of Marguerite de Valois during the St. Bartholomew’s Day massacre.

We travel through time to help history along, give it a push where it’s  needed. When the Omni’s red, it means history’s wrong. Our job’s to get  everything back on track on Monday.

We travel through time to help history along, give it a push where it’s needed. When the Omni’s red, it means history’s wrong. Our job’s to get everything back on track on Monday.

Cage With the Pharaoh’s Handmaidens by John Collier, 1883.

Cage With the Pharaoh’s Handmaidens by John Collier, 1883.